Petit Chablis

Since spring of this year, every two to three months, a few friends and I gather and enjoy wine. It’s sort of formal in that we taste wines, sometimes blind taste, discuss, and then each person gives three to four facts about the wine they brought. So far, I’ve been finding it fun and educational – a great way to learn.

wine-tasting-club

Winos.

As I write this, it’s a couple days before our next gathering. The theme is French wines, and my bottle is a Petit Chablis. I wanted a white since I’v been drinking more whites lately. Aside from it being a French Chardonnay, I didn’t know much else about Petit Chablis. After some quick research, here are three facts I’ll be sharing with the crew.

Fact 1 – Petit Chablis is from the surrounding area around the town of Chablis, in the northern Burgundy region in France, closer to Champagne and the Loire’s Sancerre. Burgundy is located in east central France, as shown in the map below. When you see a Chablis appellation, this indicates that the wine is made with 100% Chardonnay.

French wine map

Map from Wine Folly

Fact 2 – There are four Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC) in Chablis.

  1. Petit Chablis
  2. Chablis (village level Chablis)
  3. Chablis Premier Cru
  4. Chablis Grand Cru.

In 1944, the Petit Chablis appellation was created for wines that don’t fall in the other AOCs.

Fact 3 – The main difference between Petit Chablis and the more prestigious appellations is the soil. Petit Chablis wines come from vineyards on Portlandian soil and the others are planted in Kimmeridgian soil. Both are a mixture of limestone and clay; the main difference is the amount of oyster fossils. Kimmeridgian is packed with it. This influences the minerality of the wine. Indeed, a common pairing for shellfish is Chablis.

Having to present some facts about your wine is not a bad way for everyone to learn, eh?

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Vermentino, a Tasty Italian White

Until last month, I didn’t know anything about Vermentino. Now because at work, we have these limited releases wine kits that include a Vermentino in the lineup, I had to try one. So I tried a commercial equivalent.

vermetino-notes

This goes for $25 before tax at the BC Liquor Store.

It was really tasty and a good balance between a Sauv Blanc and Pinot Grigio. I sometimes find the former too tart and with citrus and green apple dominating, while the latter I sometimes find it too… easy to drink. Anyway, I’m so glad I’ve been exposed to this because it offers something in between. With flavours of white peach, lime, almond, and green apple, it’s delicate and refreshing enough to enjoy on its own, however, offers enough robustness to complement dishes.

Have you tried Vermentino? What are your thoughts?

 

Hey I’m back + Chenin Blanc

Over 1 year ago.

That was the last time I made an update here on my journey. My last job (yeah, I got a new job a couple of months ago, more on that below) was so demanding. You can read m last couple posts if you want to learn more. Although I loved it and the challenge (and the wins!), I couldn’t find the balance between being able to perform the way I wanted to in a job, which is to kick ass obviously, and to pursue this passion of mine. I needed to combine the two. It had to be wine-centric and I had to have enough spare time to update my blog. I wasn’t using what I learned. As the saying goes, when you don’t use it, you lose it.

more wine

I’m selling wine kits now. I’m talking about wine again, now not only personally but professionally, too! Last week, someone asked me to recommend a kit of ours that would be similar to this Chenin Blanc kit we used to sell. OMG, I was using my wine knowledge!

Ok, so I think I’ve shared a decent update on myself. Since you’re here, you may as well learn something, too. Maybe that’s the reason you’re here in the first place… Chenin Blanc is:

A French Varietal – It’s originally from France, made famous in the Loire Valley.

wine regions in France

Vouvray – Further to the above, it’s famous because it’s the varietal that makes Vouvray, a wine that ranges in style from still to semi-sparkling to sparkling, and from dry to succulent sweet. You won’t find Vouvray on the map above, it’s a sub region in Touraine.

Steen – That’s what Chenin Blanc is called in South Africa. It’s the most widely planted there.

p.s. I created a Facebook page. Like it and get a daily dose of me! I post every day there. Although not as in depth as here, I share what I learn there, too. I sometimes even post live videos! — that’s a big deal for me!

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